Welcome Home....

....a week later...

Welcme Home.

That phrase is reverberating within me in so many different ways of late.
• I am home from another Los Angeles trek caring for my mother (more on that later).
• My mother is back to her apartment after her month-long hospital stint.
• Jezebelle and I welcomed Don home when he moved in with us last Monday and as he settled in while I was in L.A.
• Kap'n Kurko welcomed Julian Mendenhall home as his (new) foster son. I was touched by the Welcome Home banner and balloon that John had in his house for Julian's arrival. And to see the two of them together, is such a loving experience.
• And I still find such tenderness and yes, grief in Ellie and Barry welcoming home their son, Walker as he was born and as he died at home in their loving embrace. Now Walker, has been welcomed on the other side of the veil.
The circle of life.

Crikey, no wonder my body feels as if I have just ended a marathon. Such major emotions being called forth in a rather abbreviated time frame. The good news is that I am getting better at this local jet-lag. Now it's about an 8-12 hour recovery time versus one or two days.

My mother, being the stubborn trooper that she is, worked hard to get discharged from the skilled nursing facility so that she could come home. In fact, she was due to be released this week but couldn't wait to get sprung. Can't say that I blame her. It is not a pleasant place to be on so many levels. With my mom coming home earlier, I had to realllllllly hustle to get the apartment cleared up so that she would have room to manuever her walker and wheelchair. (Thanks Nan, for coming over and pitching in for a few hours to get the kitchen ready). Lots of being on my knees dusting and vacuuming; moving furniture; making things available to her at wheelchair height.

The apartment where Mom lives does not recycle --which makes me crazy. Nan took home five grocery bags and one plastic trash bag full of stuff to recycle for me so that my car would be empty to bring more loads to Goodwill and then, three more bags and a box of old telephone books home to recycle. I guess this qualifies me as an OCD recycler. My quaint little habit of bringing back cup sleeveholders to Starbucks has gone amuk. Perhaps with all the Hollywood attention now being focused on BEING GREEN (thank you, Kermit--you were the charter member), my quirky habits will be copied or at least, understood. Now the clerks at grocery stores don't give me that glare when I bring in my own bags. Hollywood goes green thanks to Al Gore. And it was exhiliarating to know that the Academy Awards show itself went green.

And speaking of the Academy Awards, and most of us are....
This was the first year in I cannot recall how long that I did not see or effort to see all the major contenders. It was easier to do so when living in Hollywood, working in the industry and then being married to an Academy voting member. Made even easier when the Academy began sending videos(way before DVD's) out to the members for viewing.( I even recall that the very first one that the studios made a big deal about was "The SIlence of the Lambs.") With my shift to ministerial life, the urgency about my cinema habit began to diminish. And since last year was another big shift in my life, I did not find myself pushing to see the films or the ultimate nominees. I may have only seen a handful of the films up for contention. It was interesting to view the Awards show as a civilian, so to speak.

It was a long night with some strong produciton values. Some of the new ideas and creative approaches, I applaud, others not so much. Mostly, I was bored with the underwhelming fashion attire. The wrapped dresses seemed too simplistic or down-right mummified. Even the skinny-minnies that are usually poured into those liquid dresses looked less exciting in the drapes and the swirls. I appreciated Helen Mirren's gown and I liked what Diane Keaton was wearing (she looks SO amazing lately) the elegant understated gown for Reese Witherspoon. No glitz and little glamour for my vote. Oh, I did like the shadow troupe that melts themselves into objects or representations of things. I regret I did not catch their official name. And it was great to view the show on a gazilion inch screen. The Kodak theatre that was built for these shows is really an amazing venue that offers so much more in production capacity and value. Money well-spent.

For me, the strongest award winning performance was actually done by an amateur--LaKisha on the last "American Idol" show before the first nationwide voting opened. This humble mother who loves to sing with all her soul, was given her shot and she sang the song from "Dream Girls" that made Jennifer Holiday (and now, Jennifer Hudson) famous. There was not a wrong note--not just musically but from an acting stand point. LaKisha sold that song with every fiber of her being and she owned us. She may or may not win American Idol--but she will never have to work a civilian job again. I get chills when i view that clip over and over. A commanding performance.

And since I am in a Hollywoodsian mood today, may I also just comment that I do not understand the overdone coverage on the Anna Nichole Smith. Why has the media been so hypnotized by her celebrity? My respect and condolences for the loss, but is this case really worth breaking into regular television programs with news updates? Not to mention the enormous amount of publicity in magazines, radio, websites, regular TV news, etc. Unlike the woman she so adored and longed to be, Marilyn Monroe , Ms. Smith did not have the longevity or talent or star-quality (my opinion here, folks) to merit this overboard response. Peace be to her family and her little baby girl. And may Ms. Smith find peace on her new journey.

Time for a cat nap with my kitty girl now.
Purrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrfect.

Comments

Reni Williams said…
Just checking in to let you know I've been here....miss you
Reni
Reni Williams said…
Just checking in to say Hi
Love ya
Reni

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